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  • Last updated: 7 Mar 2019
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  • What’s new?
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  • A new meeting, in Rockaway, NJ, United States. Find out more here.
  • A new meeting, in Duluth, MN, United States. Find out more here.
  • A new meeting, in Lexington, KY, United States. Find out more here.
  • A new meeting, in Reno, NV, United States. Find out more here.
  • A new meeting, in Reno, NV, United States. Find out more here.
  • Numerous retreats and events over the coming months. Find out more here.
  • And remember to check the BRN calendar of events here for talks, retreats and workshops.
  • The BRN Team.
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  Welcome to buddhistrecovery.org

This is the official website of the Buddhist Recovery Network.

The Buddhist Recovery Network promotes the use of Buddhist teachings and practices to help people recover from the suffering caused by addictive behaviors and is open to people of all backgrounds, and respectful of all recovery paths.

This website presents resources that can help illuminate the Buddhist path to freedom from alcoholism and addiction. To view these resources, please click on any of the buttons in the navigation menu.

 


  Buddhist Recovery News

We are excited to present,,,

   ... a summary from the Northern California Regional Buddhist Summit

as well as...

  ... a new BRN Academy Podcast page.
 

Next BRN Academy teaching with Mary Stancavage -- April 7th 2019

Mary stancavageLetting Go of Our Stories

As soon as we’re born we’re faced with what life throws at us and we develop ways of coping that may or may not be beneficial. We’re also bombarded with messages from family, friends, school and society at large about who we are and what we should or shouldn’t be. These habits and messages become embedded and we may not even be aware of them, but they influence us on a daily basis. This is what the Buddha means when he talks about our conditioning. This conditioning can harden into the unwise stories we believe; craving and addiction are a destructive way of handling these beliefs.

In order to move towards freedom we have to wake up to our conditioning and disentangle it. Slowing down the mind and taking a step back to see the impersonal nature of the mind and developing a deep intimacy with our experience is how we move toward letting go of the craving and addiction. This talk will offer ways to examine our stories and the baggage we carry with us and investigate how to let them go in order to live a more liberated life.


Save the date for the next Buddhist Recovery Summit

September 5th-8th 2019

Registration will begin Winter 2019.
buddhistrecoverysummit.org  
 


 

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